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Author: Lavie Margolin, Career Coach

The idea of being overqualified does not seem to make much sense. Why would a company not want to consider a person who is not only qualified for the job but possess even more skills and experience than are required?  The truth is that organizations are always looking for the ‘right’ fit. Not dissimilar to the story of the three bears: not too hot, not too cold! If a person is overqualified for a job, they may take the position but quickly become dissatisfied. Perhaps they are earning less than they deserve or have to report to a person who has less qualifications or experience. Organizations are trying to avoid these problems by bringing in candidates who are the right match for the job: the amount of experience and skills required for the position. How does one overcome this challenge?

Resume
· Make sure that the message you are sending out is appropriate for your audience. When describing your experience avoid the senior level/management responsibilities and focus on more of the junior level aspects of the position.
· Go back no more than 10-15 years in your experience. A resume is not a life history but a marketing piece.
· If the job only requires a B.A.  degree, consider removing the MBA for the time being.

Cover Letter
· Focus on your experience that most relates to the position and emphasize why this job is a fit for you at this point in your career.

Interview
· Show why this position is the right fit for you now.
· As the salary will most likely be lower than you made before, emphasize why this opportunity is of interest to you and why it is not just about the salary.
· Emphasize how you can work with individuals with all different types of experience levels and have no problem reporting to someone with more junior level experience.

Be sure to keep these tips in mind when composing your resume and cover letter as well as attending future interviews for a job that is more ‘junior’ than your experience dictates. Next time, you won’t be ‘just to hot’ or ‘just to cold’, it will be just right.

 

About the Author: Lavie Margolin is a New York-based Career Coach and the author of Lion Cub Job Search: Practical Job Search Assistance for Practical Job Seekers. To learn more, go to Lavie’s website, Lion Cub Job Search:www.Lioncubjobsearch.com